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Posts Tagged ‘age reversal’

A clinical study which had the effect of reverse aging nine human subjects has been announced in a news article by the prestigious science journal Nature. The result of the study provides stunning corroboration of the testimonies of multiple insiders who claim that they were age-regressed after completing 20-year tour of duties in secret space programs.

The study involved a cocktail of drugs used on nine participants, as explained in the Nature news article authored by Alison Abbot on September 5:

For one year, nine healthy volunteers took a cocktail of three common drugs — growth hormone and two diabetes medications — and on average shed 2.5 years of their biological ages, measured by analysing marks on a person’s genomes. The participants’ immune systems also showed signs of rejuvenation.

The results of the cocktail of common drugs allegedly came as a surprise:

“I’d expected to see slowing down of the clock, but not a reversal,” says geneticist Steve Horvath at the University of California, Los Angeles, who conducted the epigenetic analysis. “That felt kind of futuristic.” The findings were published on 5 September in Aging Cell.

Horvath is cited in the Nature article describing the robust results indicating age reversal had in fact taken place:

Horvath used four different epigenetic clocks to assess each patient’s biological age, and he found significant reversal for each trial participant in all of the tests. “This told me that the biological effect of the treatment was robust,” he says. What’s more, the effect persisted in the six participants who provided a final blood sample six months after stopping the trial, he says.

Previous scientific studies have commented on the use of various drugs and gene therapies used on mice and how age-reversal had occurred on various organs.

In an article published back in March 2016, I commented on how the rodent study impacted the testimonies of the first three individuals who came forward to testify that age reversal had been used on them in secret space programs: Michael Relfe (2000), Randy Cramer (2014) and Corey Goode (2015).

In my book, Insiders Reveal Secret Space Programs (Sept 2015), I compared the testimonies of Relfe, Cramer, and Goode in terms of the drug cocktail that was used on them over a two to three-week period to age reverse them. For example, Goode said that he was given a drug cocktail while he was held immobile and unconscious, and it had the effect of age regressing him 20 years in 2007. He was then returned back in time to when he began his covert service in December 1986.

Recently, Cramer underwent a lie detector test which found no deception in his retelling of his alleged involvement in a secret space program.

Soon after my book’s publication, William Tompkins, a retired aerospace engineer, emerged and explained his involvement in the development of different drugs that could be used for age-regression in a classified project conducted by the aerospace company TRW from 1967-`1971.

In addition to Relfe, Cramer, and Goode, I have found a number of former military servicemen who believe they went through an age-reversal program at the end of a 20 year covert assignment in a secret space program. To date only one has agreed to come publicly forward – Michael Gerloff who served in the US Marine Corps and as an Army Ranger before serving as a police officer.

Gerloff’s testimony of having been recruited during USMC boot camp, has had the effect of triggering others to recall similar experiences. They have approached me with their stories but have decided to remain anonymous due to concerns over their current careers if they publicly start discussing their involvement in a 20 and back program.

At the time of the 2016 age regression study on rodents, clinical studies on humans were forecast to be years away. The news article published in Nature suggests that such studies have begun even though the September 2019 clinical study was framed to be an accidental byproduct of the experiment’s original intent.

The result of the experiment using a cocktail of three drugs is stunning validation for insiders such as William Tompkins, Corey Goode, and the growing list of others who claim they have been involved in either the development or use of age reversal drugs used in secret space programs.

Prior to his surprising death in August 2017, Tompkins says that he was told that plans had been made for age-reversal drugs to be released into the public arena. With the publication of the clinical study showing age regression on nine human subjects, it appears that we are getting much closer to the day that age reversal and other life changing technologies are released into the public arena.

© Michael E. Salla, Ph.D. Copyright Notice

Further Reading

Due to recent breakthroughs in genetic research, the claims of three whistleblowers, who say they underwent an age-regression process in secret space programs, have become that much more plausible. The whistleblowers, Corey Goode, Randy Cramer and Michael Relfe, all say that they were age-regressed to become 20 years younger at the end of their respective tours of duty in secret space programs.

Recently, geneticists have identified the genes that control the aging process, and in stunning experiments, the results of which have been released in peer reviewed scientific journals, have demonstrated that they were able to reverse the aging process to varying degrees of success.

The results of these experiments make it plausible that the three whistleblowers did indeed undergo an age-regression process using classified medical technologies in secret space programs, as they claimed.

The lead genetic scientist in the publicly announced age reversal studies is Dr. David Sinclair, who discussed in an interview the results of his genetic experiments first conducted on mice:

We’ve discovered genes that control how the body fights against ageing and these genes, if you turn them on just the right way, they can have very powerful effects, even reversing ageing – at least in mice so far…  We fed them a molecule that’s called NMN and this reversed ageing completely within just a week of treatment in the muscle, and now we’re looking to reverse all aspects of ageing if possible.

He explained how this process could also be done safely for humans:

We’ve gone from mice into early human studies actually. There have been some clinical trials around the world, and we’re hoping in the next few years to know if this will actually work in people as well … They show that the molecules that extend lifespan in mice are safe in people.

Professor Sinclair went on to say in his interview that drugs based on the nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) molecule could be successfully developed “to restore youthfulness in human cells.”

Sinclair’s view that NMN based drugs will eventually be developed for safe use by humans is stunning in its implications. He may well be in the midst of developing the fabled elixir of life, which accounts for him quickly being elevated into the world’s 100 most influential people according to Time Magazine.

It’s important to point out that Sinclair’s pioneering genetic research is open source and unclassified. This means that is very likely, if not almost certain, that classified research in the field of age reversal/regression technology is far more advanced than anything achieved by Sinclair and his peers.

In several private interviews with William Tompkins, a former U.S. Naval Intelligence operative who subsequently worked with leading aerospace contractors for more than four decades, he revealed that he worked on a classified study developed by the company, TRW, on age regression drugs from 1967-1971.

Tompkins said that he first came across the development of age-regression technologies when he participated in the debriefings of U.S. Navy spies, from 1942 to 1945, at the Naval Air Station, San Diego. These spies revealed the existence of age-regression studies that were then secretly underway in Nazi Germany.

At the time, Tompkins job was to distribute briefing packets to U.S. companies and think tanks with expertise in the areas used by the Nazis for developing their breakthrough technologies. Tompkins said that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) was among the academic research centers delivered briefing packets by him. Therefore it is possible that scientists at MIT have been aware of the Nazi age-regression studies since 1942!

Significantly, Sinclair’s breakthrough in age-regression studies was achieved while he was a post-doctoral fellow at MIT under Dr. Leonard Guarente at M.I.T.  Was this merely coincidence, or was Sinclair helped or encouraged while at MIT to develop the insights into the age reversal potential of genetic manipulation?

Recently, Tompkins has privately disclosed to me that classified “age-regression” drugs have been developed. He says these drugs have been used for some time in the “20 year and back” tours of duty in secret space programs. This is consistent with the age-regression process described by Goode, Cramer and Relfe, which involved medication administered to them over a two week period where they were physically immobilized.

Even more recently, Tompkins says the drugs have been refined so that they can be used for more extensive age-regression periods. For example, reversing a 90 year old back to where s/he has the physical body of a 27 year old is now possible. Tompkins says that there is a covert U.S. Navy sanctioned disclosure process underway to release these age-regression technologies into the public sector. It is, therefore, possible that Sinclair’s research may have been stimulated by this covert Navy initiative during his time at MIT.

At the very least, Sinclair’s pioneering age-reversal experiments and identification of the NMN molecule that can be used for developing “age-regression” drugs means that the claims of Goode, Cramer and Relfe no longer appear so outlandish, and are indeed scientifically feasible.

© Michael E. Salla, Ph.D. Copyright Notice

Further Reading